Chelsea Clinton looks gorgeous on the cover of Elle. Credit: Paola Kudacki for Elle

The First Daughter loves being a mother! Six months after giving birth to her first child, Chelsea Clinton looks gorgeous on the cover of the May issue of Elle magazine, where she dishes about her life with daughter Charlotte.

"Marc and I are like, 'What did we do before we were parents?'" gushed Clinton, 35. The only child of Bill and Hillary Clinton welcomed daughter Charlotte in September 2014 with her husband of four years, Marc Mezvinsky.

"My whole life is reoriented around my daughter in the most blessed sense," she continued of the little one, 6 months. "I now understand — this is something else that Marc and I talk about all the time — all of the enthusiastic, bombastically spectacular, wonderful things people say about their children, because we also feel and think all those things about Charlotte — that she is just the most remarkable little bubbly, perfect, chunky monkey creature ever."

Stunning on the Elle cover in a figure-hugging sleeveless dress with a cutout at the collar, Clinton spoke to the mag at an interesting time for her family. While there have been widespread rumors for months, her mother Hillary, 67, has yet to confirm if she will be running for president in the 2016 election. The former First Lady is expected to announce her candidacy this coming weekend. 

The NBC contributor, who grew up in the White House under her father's presidency, told Elle that she thinks it's important for women to be in leadership roles.

"We've made real progress on legal protections for women, but in no way are women at parity to men in our country in the workplace," the new mom explained. "And if we look in the political sphere, it is challenging to me that women comprising 20 percent of Congress is treated as a real success. Since when did 20 percent become the definition of equality?"

"When you ask about the importance of having a woman president, absolutely it’s important, for, yes, symbolic reasons — symbols are important; it is important who and what we choose to elevate, and to celebrate," Clinton continued. "And one of our core values in this country is that we are the land of equal opportunity, but when equal hasn't yet included gender, there is a fundamental challenge there that, I believe, having our first woman president — whenever that is — will help resolve."

"Do I think it would make a substantive difference?" she added. "Yes, we've seen again and again, when women have been in positions of leadership, they have had different degrees of success versus their male counterparts, historically being able to build more consensus so that decisions have longer-term effects, whether in economic investments or in building social capital. Who sits around the table matters. And who sits at the head of the table matters, too."