University of Nebraska Omaha student Shannon Workman was in shock. On April 3, the 20-year-old learned she was being kicked out of her sorority, Chi Omega, to which she had belonged for three years. The reason: Workman’s Tinder profile featured a photograph of herself posing with her sisters on Bid Day, the day sororities accept new pledges. She was fully clothed in the snap. 

“At first, I was speechless,” Workman tells Us Weekly. “I was like, ‘Is this a joke?’”

But it wasn’t. 

In the sit-down meeting, chapter leaders claimed Workman’s picture violated their “human dignity” rule — and accused her of using a “suggestive” and “risqué” photo to meet men. “There’s a really vague policy that says you can’t identify Chi Omega in any situation that could be considered distasteful,” the college junior tells Us Weekly. “But I don’t think it’s a bad thing to say you’re a Chi Omega on a dating app! I was really proud to be a Chi Omega.” 

When Workman began to defend herself, one chapter official became angry. “She was like, ‘This isn’t about your Tinder account anymore. This is about your disrespectful attitude, your combative attitude,’” the elementary education major says.

Workman isn’t the first Chi Omega to be given the boot. “One of my good friends, she got her membership revoked because she retweeted a song that had a cuss word in it,” says the Nebraska native. “Another got kicked out for having a party at her house — and she wasn’t even at the party!”

However, Workman isn’t bitter. “Chi Omega gave me everything I wanted in a sorority,” Workman says. “I got amazing sisters, I got to raise money for Make-a-Wish, and those were the top two things I wanted to do in college."

Chi Omega claims Workman quit on her own accord and released the following statement to Good Morning America: “Personnel matters are handled by our local chapters. Chi Omega process offers a series of checks and balances to ensure any sanctions imposed are reasonable and fair. Shannon opted to voluntarily resign from membership. The national organization offers an appeal process to those who do not voluntarily resign.”

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