Queen Elizabeth visited her great-granddaughter Princess Charlotte Credit: Ian Forsyth/Getty Images; John Stillwell/AFP/Getty Images

Quite a day for a tiny baby! The brand-new Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana of Cambridge had a lot in store for her on Tuesday, May 5.

The 3-day-old daughter of Prince William and Kate Middleton was first officially recognized in the United Kingdom with a registration of her birth. "The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have formally registered the birth of Princess Charlotte," a rep for Kensington Palace said in a statement to Us Weekly. "The Duke of Cambridge signed the birth register at Kensington Palace this afternoon witnessed by a Registrar from Westminster Register Office."

Available to the public, the birth registration gives details on the little princess' entrance to the world. Her date and place of birth is listed as "Second May 2015" at "St. Mary's Hospital" on "Praed Street" in Westminster. The baby girl's full name is spelled out as Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana of Cambridge, while her father, 32, signed the form as His Royal Highness Prince William Arthur Philip Louis Duke of Cambridge. 

The Duke's occupation is listed as Prince of the United Kingdom, while his daughter already claims the occupation of Princess of the United Kingdom after being alive for less than a week. The Duchess, 33, is registered under her full name of Catherine Elizabeth Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Cambridge. Westminster Council registrar Alison Cathcart, who also registered Prince George's birth, visited Kensington Palace for William and Kate to fill out the form.

Now officially fulfilling her occupational duties as princess, baby Charlotte also got one very important visitor on Tuesday. Queen Elizabeth arrived at Kensington Palace at about 2:45 p.m. local time in London. 

She made the trip with help from a chauffeur to spend time with her great-granddaughter, who is now the matriarch's fifth great-grandchild. The longtime ruler, 89, was included among honorees with the royal baby's full name. The three-part royal moniker also nods to the late Princess Diana and Prince Charles, among others.