CBS News' Lara Logan Felt Egypt Revolt "Too Important" Not to Report

Celebrity News Feb. 21, 2011 AT 3:36PM
CBS News' Lara Logan Felt Egypt Revolt "Too Important" Not to Report Credit: CBS/Craig Blankenhorn/Landov

As CBS News' Lara Logan recovers from the brutal February 11 sexual assault and beating she sustained while reporting on the aftermath of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak's departure, a fellow journalist tells UsMagazine.com Logan felt it was her duty to get the story out.

According to the network, Logan -- who was on assignment for 60 Minutes -- was "separated from her crew" in the mob of more than 200 people who congregated in Egypt's Tahrir Square when Mubarak stepped down.

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The network's Chief Foreign Correspondent, 39, was then "surrounded and suffered a brutal and sustained sexual assault and beating" before a group of women and Egyptian soldiers came to her aid.

New accounts of the mob attack published in The Sunday Times of London claim Logan's attackers beat her with fists and flag poles.

"Lara is getting better daily," a friend told the Times. "The psychological trauma is as bad as, if not worse than, the physical injuries. She might talk about it at some time in the future, but not now."

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"After what happened with Lara Logan, one of her crew people called me to say, 'Watch out,'" Lara Setrakian, who reports for ABC News and Bloomberg News, tells Us. "So much of our job is about being there, being on the ground, and you find a way to deal with it," says Setrakian, who was also assaulted in Egypt.

Logan's colleagues continue to praise the work she did in the Middle East.

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"Lara was roughed up by Mubarak's thugs and said publicly the story was too important to let that deter her," Robert H. Reid, who has covered the region for The Associated Press since 1978, says of Logan. "A number of other people were detained but left the country after their release but she went back to street reporting. It does take a special kind of person to keep going back into threat areas."

"Contrary to what many people think its not being a violence junkie or being hooked on adrenalin," Reid continues. "It's a matter of pride...and a sense that the job has to be done."

Adds the U.S. Embassy in Cairo's press spokesperson Elizabeth O. Colton, Ph.D: "[Lara]'s a fine journalist...and I admire her brave journalistic efforts."

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