Sinead O'Connor Compares U2's Songs of Innocence Album Release to Terrorism

Sinead O'Connor is not pleased with the release of the new U2 album. Credit: Stefania D'Alessandro/Getty Images

There's little hometown love between Sinead O'Connor and the men of U2. The Irish singer-songwriter, 47, had some choice words for her compatriots in a new interview, slamming the musicians for the release of their latest album.

O'Connor spoke to the Daily Mail's Event magazine, voicing her opinion on U2's unconventional debut of their Songs of Innocence album. Bono, The Edge, Adam Clayton, and Larry Mullen Jr. gave fans (and haters, for that matter) a free download of the record through an automatic iTunes add. 

"What they did with iTunes was a badly judged move," O'Connor said of U2, who received mixed reactions to their bold assumption that all iTunes users would want their album. 

"There was something almost terrorist about it," the controversial singer told the mag. "I'm really not a U2 fan but it wasn't at all kosher invading people's lives like that. It was bad management."

"Funny thing is, the kid who devised the app that removed the U2 album from people's computers — he made a fortune apparently," she added.

Bono and his bandmates have yet to comment on O'Connor's harsh words.