Malcolm-Jamal Warner Reacts to Bill Cosby Rape Allegations: "It's Painful to Watch My Friend and Mentor Go Through This"

Bill Cosby's former Cosby Show costar and TV son Malcolm-Jamal Warner has spoken out about the rape allegations against the comedian Credit: Maury Phillips/WireImage; Peter Kramer/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank/Getty Images

Another former Huxtable is speaking out. Bill Cosby's Cosby Show costar and TV son Malcolm-Jamal Warner has finally responded to the comedian's rape allegations in a new interview with Billboard magazine. Last month, the actor kept mum about the situation when asked by a TMZ cameraman.

"He's one of my mentors, and he's been very influential and played a big role in my life as a friend and mentor. Just as it's painful to hear any woman talk about sexual assault, whether true or not, it's just as painful to watch my friend and mentor go through this," Warner, 44, told the mag.

"I can't really speak on any of the allegations because obviously, I was not there. The Bill Cosby I know has been great to me and great for a lot of people," he continued. "What he's done for comedy and television has been legendary and history-making. What he's done for the black community and education has been invaluable. That's the Bill Cosby I know. I can't speak on the other stuff."

Warner acted alongside Cosby, 77, in the beloved network series from 1984 to 1992. His fellow costars Phylicia Rashad, 66, and Keshia Knight Pulliam, 35, also have since spoken up about the allegations that have tarnished Cosby's reputation in recent months.

Rashad, who played Cosby's on-screen wife, spoke to ABC News on Jan. 7. "This is not about the women — this is about something else," she said. "This is about the obliteration of legacy."

Pulliam, who played Cosby's daughter Rudy Huxtable, told Access Hollywood that she couldn't "speak" to the claims. "Whoever is involved, those are the people who were there. I wasn't there. I can only speak to the great man that I know and that I love…" she said on Jan. 5. "Unfortunately, in the court of public opinion everyone has formed their opinion, but we're still in America and you're innocent until proven guilty of any crimes."