Hot seat! Ted Cruz stopped by Late Night on Monday, March 16, and faced serious questions from host Seth Meyers on a range of hot-button issues. 

The Saturday Night Live alum, 41, paused his standard lineup of lighthearted celebrity interviews, musical performances, and comedy bits to dive into Cruz's politics. Meyers broached the politician's reputation in Washington, noting that Senator John McCain once called him a "wacko bird," while Congressman Peter King said Cruz was not a responsible adult.

"Oh, look. I think you're just trying to sweet-talk me, Seth," Cruz, 44, shot back. "I think a lot of people are fed up with Washington and I'll tell ya... John McCain has actually become a friend of mine since then. We have a very warm relationship. But after he called me a wacko bird, I tell ya, it was very interesting."

One move that inspired Cruz's reputation was his extended filibuster, held in an attempt to block the passing of President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. 

"I was filibustering, 21 hours to stop Obamacare," Cruz began, before Meyers jumped in, teasing, "Gotcha. How'd it go?"

Meyers' rebuttal inspired a cheer from his studio audience, who continued to applaud as Cruz showed a bit of annoyance on his face. Meyers finally quieted the crowd down as Cruz chose not to speak over the cheers. 

"It actually went fabulously, because right now, Obamacare has 37 percent approval rating and as a result of Obamacare, Harry Reid and the Democrats lost the senate, and in 2016, I think we're gonna see a very different election result," maintained an incredulous Cruz, who is potentially eyeing a bid for the presidency in 2016.

Meyers then took on Cruz's political hopes, questioning whether the Senator would be able to gain enough support with his polarizing opinions.

"In order to get elected President, you have to have, you know, at least half of the people," Meyers began. "[They] have to agree with your positions... Let's talk about gay marriage... At right time, 59 percent of Americans think gay marriage should be legal, 40 percent of Republicans, yet, you just passed a bill saying states should be allowed to decide on their own. Why take up that cause now when it seems like it's inevitable that the tide of progress is gonna turn that way?"

"Listen, I'm a Constitutionalist," Cruz said. "For over 200 years, marriage has been a question for the states. Now, personally I believe in traditional marriage between one man and one woman. But if you want to change the marriage laws, the way to do it constitutionally, is convince your fellow citizens to go to the state legislator and change it. It shouldn't be the federal government or unelected judges imposing their own definition of marriage. We should, instead, respect our constitutional system."

"You know, I read the Constitution this morning, and I don't know if you're right on all that stuff," Meyers shot back. Watch Cruz's reaction in the video above!