Sarah Jessica Parker attends the 2016 PEN America Literary Gala. Credit: J. Countess/Getty Images

Sarah Jessica Parker has cut ties with Mylan, the manufacturer of EpiPen, a portable injector that can stop a life-threatening allergic reaction. Her reason: The company has steadily increased the price for a pack of two from around $100 in 2007 to more than $600 in recent years, a hike of more than 400 percent. 

“I’m left disappointed, saddened and deeply concerned by Mylan’s actions,” the former Sex and the City star, 51, wrote in an Instagram post on Thursday, August 25. “I do not condone this decision and I have ended my relationship with Mylan as a direct result of it.” 

She continued, “I hope they will seriously reconsider the outpouring of voices of those millions of people who are dependent on the device, and take swift action to lower the cost to be more affordable for whom it is a life-saving necessity.”

A photo posted by SJP (@sarahjessicaparker) on

According to The New York Times, Mylan has imposed two 15 percent increases a year for the past few years. 

Parker had been a paid spokesperson for Mylan in May and spoke to Us Weekly about her 13-year-old son James Wilkie’s life-threatening peanut allergy and revealed that he carried two EpiPens. In the interview, Parker told Us she was surprised to learn that 43 million Americans are at risk for anaphylaxis, and every six minutes, food allergy reactions send someone to the emergency room.

Meanwhile, the Emmy winner isn’t the only famous face taking aim at Mylan. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton released a statement on Wednesday, August 24, in which she called the price hikes “outrageous, and just the latest example of a company taking advantage of its consumers.” 

“It’s wrong when drug companies put profits ahead of patients, raising prices without justifying the value behind them,” Clinton, 68, said.

On Thursday, Mylan announced the company will be offering coupons covering up to $300 “for patients in health plans who face higher out-of-pocket costs.”

“As a mother, I can assure you, the last thing that we would ever want is no one to have their EpiPen due to price,” Mylan CEO Heather Bresch said in an interview with CNBC Thursday. “Our response has been to take that immediate action making sure everyone has an EpiPen.”

Bresch defended the price hike by pointing to the marketing and distribution costs of EpiPens. 

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