Pamela Anderson Ad Banned in Britain for Being "Sexist and Degrading to Women"

Entertainment Jun. 5, 2013 AT 1:45PM
Pamela Anderson's TV commercial for Dreamscape Networks's Crazy Domains has been pulled off the air by Advertising Standards Authority for being "sexiest and degrading to women." Pamela Anderson's TV commercial for Dreamscape Networks's Crazy Domains has been pulled off the air by Advertising Standards Authority for being "sexiest and degrading to women." Credit: Mike Marsland/WireImage.com

Is Pamela Anderson too hot for Britain? The 45-year-old former Baywatch star's sexy new TV commercial for Dreamscape Networks' Crazy Domains has been banned.

Great Britain's Advertising Standards Authority ruled that the ad could no longer be broadcast in its recent form after receiving four complaints that it was "sexist and degrading to women."

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The commercial features Anderson in an office addressing a boardroom full of men with the help of her female assistant. It then cuts to a dream sequence with one of the men (named Adam) fantasizing about the women dancing in bikinis, covered in cream.

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"The ASA understood that the ad was intended as a parody of a mundane business meeting and was intended to be humorous and light-hearted. Whilst we noted Dreamscape Networks' and Clearcast's comments about the female characters being portrayed as strong, confident business women, we considered that they were also portrayed sexually throughout the ad, not just during the fantasy sequence," the ASA said in its ruling. "Although the fantasy scene, which we considered was sexually suggestive, was limited to Adam's imagination, we considered it gave the impression that he viewed his female colleagues as sexual objects to be lusted after. Because of that, we considered the ad was likely to cause serious offense to some viewers on the basis that it was sexist and degrading to women."

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Dreamscape Networks, however, defended the ad, arguing that it was a meant to be "over-the-top and comical." The company also said they hired Anderson because she is a "celebrity who was known for flaunting her body."

 

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