‘Real Housewives of New Jersey’ Recap: Siggy Admits She Doesn’t Think Margaret Is Anti-Semitic

Siggy Flicker and Margaret Josephs
Siggy Flicker and Margaret Josephs. Heidi Gutman/Bravo/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images; Charles Sykes/Bravo/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

If you can’t take the heat, you better get out of New Jersey. On the December 20, episode of The Real Housewives of New Jersey, the women seemed hopeful that they could heal the wounds they’d recently ripped open by cooking an authentic Italian meal together. Teresa Giudice, Dolores Catania, and Margaret Josephs went grocery shopping, where it was painfully evident just how little any of them know about grocery shopping.

Meanwhile, Siggy Flicker, Melissa Gorga and Danielle Staub went biking (or, in Melissa’s case “drunk biking,” as she had apparently had a glass of wine prior to the outing). Oh, also, Siggy decided not to listen to her husband and to just stay for the rest of the trip.

Soggy Flicker Is Back

Later that afternoon, Siggy’s feelings about her battle with Margaret rose to the surface yet again. “I just feel like Margaret has been very insensitive with me,” Siggy said as she broke into tears. Melissa said Margaret did speak harshly but she did not believe Margaret was anti-Semitic. “I gave her an opportunity to say, ‘Yeah, maybe that was in poor taste,’” Siggy added, circling back to the Hitler comment.

Melissa encouraged Siggy to meet Margaret halfway and acknowledge that Margaret’s feelings were also “valid,” but she wasn’t going to get that from Siggy – at least not yet. Instead of continuing to fester, they decided to enjoy their post-biking picnic and drink some more wine, which sounded like a good call.

Italian Food Cures All (Maybe)

Everyone met back up for dinner, praying that Siggy and Margaret wouldn’t kill each other. In an attempt to break the uncomfortable silence, Melissa pulled Margaret into the kitchen. “I’m trying to make sure you’re OK,” Melissa said. Margaret assured the aspiring entrepreneur that she was fine and they headed back to the table, where Margaret apologized to Siggy.

“I never knew that would hurt you to the core and if I did, I never would have said it,” Margaret said to Siggy. “I never want to hurt you. I’m sorry.” Siggy responded by take a big gulp of wine. Danielle then jumped in to tell Margaret she thought it was “brave” that she apologized in front of everyone, and Teresa seconded that notion. Siggy still remained stone silent.

“You just don’t get over a comment like that within 24 hours,” Siggy said to the camera. She added that she was just trying to survive the meal but couldn’t find it in herself to do anything beyond that.

Time Heals All Wounds … Eventually

Danielle joined Margaret to go check out some shoes to potentially include in her line. Danielle then told Margaret she thought Siggy calling Margaret an anti-Semite was worse than Margaret referencing Hitler during an argument. Siggy, meanwhile, was sticking to her guns – namely, that she wasn’t ready to meet Margaret in the middle. In another part of town, Teresa encouraged Siggy to reconsider making peace with Margaret. Siggy conceded that she would consider it, but made no promises of anything else.

Later, chatting with Melissa, Margaret insisted that she didn’t even know there was such a thing as “trigger words,” but Melissa assured her that was indeed, a thing. Melissa gave Margaret a charm bracelet and they solidified their mutual admiration for each other before heading to the final supper (of the trip).

The Last Supper

With tempers cooled (at least a bit), the girls all gathered for a final meal in Italy. Shortly after settling in, Siggy told Margaret, “Last night you gave me a heartfelt apology that was sincere and I thank you for that. I need time to process that. I’m still upset. I don’t think anybody should reference Hitler.”

Margaret steeled herself and replied, “I said I was sorry. Do you genuinely feel I am anti-Semitic?” Siggy didn’t answer that question right away, instead offering an explanation. “Where I came up with that was not out of the sky. All of these moments of me feeling attacked by Margaret and then the Hitler statement, that’s where it came from – but if I hurt your feelings, then I apologize for that,” she said.

“I’m trying to take it the best way I possibly can,” Margaret said with a sigh. “Listen, I know that you’re trying to apologize but it’s not about that you hurt my feelings. It’s about that you aligned me with a hate group.” She paused and added, “That’s relationship-ending, career-ending.” She then argued that her saying the word “Hitler” had no chance of ruining Siggy’s life, whereas Siggy accusing her of being anti-Semitic could have serious repercussions, both personally and professionally.

“Listen I said it in the heat of the moment, but I don’t really think that you are anti-Semitic,” Siggy finally, begrudgingly admitted. “I don’t believe that Margaret is anti-Semitic. I believe that Margaret is anti-Siggy.” Margaret then asked Siggy if she considered herself a compassionate person and pointed out that Siggy didn’t always play by her own rules. “I think that everyone is human and if you give yourself a pass, you should give some other people a pass.”

Melissa then said she was very excited that everyone was “getting along.” (What dinner was she at?) Margaret took a moment of calm to invite everyone to the upcoming, Studio 54-themed birthday party … so we can look forward to the fight continuing there.

Tell Us: Do you think Siggy’s apology was genuine?

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