Angelina Jolie Was ‘Feeling Butterflies’ Ahead of Her First London School of Economics Lecture

UN Special Envoy, Angelina Jolie speaks at the UN Peacekeeping Defence Ministerial at Lancaster House on September 8, 2016 in London, England. Credit: Adrian Dennis - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

Just call her "professor"! Angelina Jolie delivered her first lecture at the London School of Economics and Political Science as a visiting professor on Tuesday, March 14.

“I’m a little nervous, feeling butterflies,” she told The Evening Standard before speaking to students enrolled in the master’s course in Women, Peace and Security. “I hope I do well. This is very important to me.”

According to British newspaper, the By the Sea actress, 41, who is a special envoy of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, spoke to the students about how sexual violence and rape are used to create terror during wars, and her firsthand experience visiting areas where this occurs. The Maleficent star and Britain’s former foreign secretary William Hague started a campaign on the same topic, back in 2012, called the Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative.

After the lecture, students took to social media to praise her speech and share photos taken with Jolie. “She’ll make an amazing visiting professor. So honored to hear her inaugural lecture at LSE on sexual violence, rape, working w/ refugees,” one student tweeted. “Ms. Jolie, you did wonderfully!” Another added, “Incredible lecture by Angelina today.”

Incredible lecture by Angelina today

A post shared by Alana Foster (@lanifoz) on

Jolie and Hague also founded the LSE’s Centre for Women, Peace and Security in 2015. "It is vital that we broaden the discussion on how to advance women's rights and end impunity for crimes that disproportionately affect women, such as sexual violence in conflict," Jolie said in a statement to The Guardian last May. "I am looking forward to teaching and to learning from the students, as well as to sharing my own experiences of working alongside governments and the United Nations."

Both Jolie and Hague committed to teaching at least once a year, according to The Guardian. The unpaid position, which officially begins in September 2017, will also entail lectures, workshops and personal research. 

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