Kato Kaelin arrives for the Dream Builders Project in 2015 Credit: Gabriel Olsen/WireImage

It’s safe to assume that Kato Kaelin isn’t the biggest fan of The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. The key witness during Simpson’s 1995 trial penned a review of the anthology for the New York Daily News, and according to Kato, a lot of what the FX series portrays didn’t happen. 

The former radio personality, who now hosts a show called Sports Haters, is also not a fan of the blond wig worn by Billy Magnussen, who portrays Kaelin.

“I have often said that the media made me out to be a bigger player in this drama than I ever was, and American Crime Story: The People v. OJ Simpson couldn't pass up on that either,” Kaelin explained in his review. “Whether it be for comedic relief or getting the most bang out their buck for that god-awful wig, (anyone remember Dana Carvey playing Garth from Wayne's World?) there's too much Kato Kaelin in this series — even for Kato Kaelin's taste!”

Kaelin, who lived in Simpson’s guest house at the time of Nicole Simpson Brown’s murder and testified against the former NFL pro, claims that a lot of what FX is portraying never really happened. 

“For example, the second episode shows Kato sitting with OJ's family when Robert Kardashian announces that OJ killed himself and reads the suicide note,” Kaelin revealed of the show’s upcoming Tuesday, February 9, episode. “I was never there. Did that actually happen? I don't know. I just know I wasn't there … The point is, that never happened.”

Kaelin warned in his review that he’s nervous viewers will get their facts messed up.

“The series does a good job using actual news footage during the chase,” Kaelin added, “[but] I'm afraid a whole new generation will be watching this as a documentary rather than a drama.”

The now 56-year-old also reviewed the premiere of the Ryan Murphy-produced show and addressed those who read his review as “nitpicky” or “absurd.”

“Nitpicky would be complaining they didn't get the right shade of blonde. Absurdity is the fact that some people are ok with the series' inability to get it right,” he concluded in the review. “When the ‘who what why where and whens’ are actually documented and they still get it wrong, then how much fabrication will there be, on things that aren't in court transcripts? How do we know the private conversations ever happened? How do we know the tone or intention is the way it's portrayed? We don't. I just know a lot of what I've seen so far involving ME — never happened.”

Sign up now for the Us Weekly newsletter to get breaking celebrity news, hot pics, and more delivered straight to your inbox!