Margot Robbie Doesn't Consider Herself "Particularly Attractive," Says Her Girlfriends Are Prettier Than Her

Celebrity News Jul. 10, 2014 AT 8:10AM
Margot Robbie in Vanity Fair
Margot Robbie opens up to Vanity Fair. Credit: Miguel Reveriego exclusively for Vanity Fair

Wait, what?! Margot Robbie claimed in the August issue of Vanity Fair that she doesn't think she's "particularly attractive."

"In my big group of girlfriends at home, I am definitely not the best-looking," The Wolf of Wall Street actress, 24, told the mag. "I did not grow up feeling like I was particularly attractive."

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"You should have seen me at 14, with braces and glasses, gangly and doing ballet!" the Aussie went on to say, "If I looked good in Wolf of Wall Street I cannot take full credit; it was because of the hair extensions and makeup."

The blonde stunner went on to tell the mag despite her ambitions to enter showbiz, her "family had nothing to do with the entertainment industry." In fact, they're farmers! "We had farming on both sides. My mother’s family raised grains and crops. My father’s grew sugarcane and mangos," she said, "So I knew more about the basics of farming than of acting."

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"But my background was real­ly helpful when I was shooting Z for Zachariah,” the actress said of the post-apocalyptic drama, starring Chiwetel Ejiofor set for release in 2015. “I already knew how to drive a tractor and milk cows.”

Other fun facts the About Time actress revealed? She's worked as everything from a waitress to a housecleaner and even a sandwich-maker at Subway; via those odd jobs, she "saved up enough to get me through three years unemployed" to make the move from Australia to Hollywood.

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“People ask me all the time what it is about Australia that produces so many big stars,” Robbie says of A-listers like Cate Blanchett, Nicole Kidman, Hugh Jackman and Russell Crowe. “Honestly, I believe it is a combination of things. Our education standards are quite high, but our industry is very limited. Yet we’re very aware of the industry—everyone goes to the theater, sees TV shows. The logical step is to make a move to America—America is getting the best of the best of us."

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