Bermuda Triangle Mystery May Have Just Been Solved

Mind blown. The mystery behind the Bermuda Triangle may have just been solved, according to the New York Post

A new theory suggests that clouds may be the reason why so many ships and planes have disappeared in the Western area of the north Atlantic ocean over the years with no explanation. Watch the clip above from Science Channel's What On Earth? for the fascinating explanation.

Hurricane Nicole is seen approaching Bermuda in this image from NOAA's GOES-East satellite taken at 12pm ET (16:00GMT) October 12, 2016.
Hurricane Nicole is seen approaching Bermuda on October 12, 2016. NASA/NOAA GOES Project/Handout via REUTERS

The hexagonal-shaped clouds are called "air bombs." They can reach speeds up to 170 miles per hour and be as wide as 20 to 50 miles, which can create waves more than 45 feet high. That kind of force can take down objects that cross into the specific location between Bermuda, Miami, Florida and San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Meteorologists spoke about the possible discovery during a recent episode of What on Earth?

"You don’t typically see straight edges with clouds," Dr. Steve Miller from Colorado State University said. "Most of the time, clouds are random in their distribution."

"[The air bombs] are formed by what are called microbursts," Dr. Randy Cerveny from the University of Arizona added. "And they’re blasts of air that come down out of the bottom of a cloud and then hit the ocean and then create waves that can sometimes be massive in size and they start to interact with each other."

According to reports, boats and planes have gone missing in the Bermuda Triangle since the early 1600s. Last year, the U.S. cargo ship El Faro, with 28 Americans on board, disappeared during Hurricane Joaquin.

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