Donald Trump’s Inauguration Portrait Shelved by Library of Congress for Terribly Obvious Typo

Spell-check, anyone? An inauguration portrait of President Donald Trump was pulled from the Library of Congress store after social media users pointed out an egregious typo on Sunday, February 12.

The poster in question featured a beaming Trump, 70, in a navy-blue suit, crisp white shirt and bold red tie. A quote from his inauguration was printed over his chest, but within the four short lines was one very obvious mistake.

“No dream is too big, no challenge is to great,” the quote read, misspelling the second too. “Nothing we want for the future is beyond our reach.” The portrait had a presidential seal stamped on the bottom center of the image and the real estate mogul’s squiggly signature next to it.

Donald Trump
President Donald Trump delivers his inaugural address on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 20, 2017, in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images

The 8-by-10-inch print was being sold by the Library of Congress for $16.95; the image’s designer, John Rupert, has the same portrait for sale on his website, though it was grammatically correct and a tad cheaper, according to the New York Daily News.

The Library of Congress opted to quietly remove the item from their site Sunday night after eagle-eyed social media users began to mock the error.

https://twitter.com/StephBGoldberg/status/830957383975391232

This isn’t the first time that proxies of the White House and the administration have made a spelling error in a very public sphere. Also on Sunday, the Department of Education attempted to tweet out a message referencing African American writer and civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois, but misspelled his name.

“Education must not simply teach work — it must teach life,” the department’s Twitter handle tweeted, crediting the inspirational quote to “W.E.B. DeBois.” Though it is unclear who specifically sent out the tweet, it is worth noting that the newly sworn-in Secretary of Education is Betsy DeVos.

Upon realizing its error, the department then tweeted out an apology for the error four hours later, misspelling “apologies” in the process. “Post updated — our deepest apologizes for the earlier typo,” the tweet read.

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