Rio Olympics Have 450,000 Condoms for Athletes, But It’s ‘Tough to Hook Up on Twin Beds’

A condoms' distribution machine at the Olympic and Paralympic Village for the 2016 Rio Olympic Games displaying the Olympic Rings in Barra da Tijuca.
A condoms' distribution machine at the Olympic and Paralympic Village for the 2016 Rio Olympic Games displaying the Olympic Rings in Barra da Tijuca. Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Safety first! The Rio Olympics, which are set to kick off on Friday, August 5, are preparing its athletes for a whirlwind two weeks with a stockpile of 450,000 condoms, according to USA Today. The publication reports that this number breaks down to approximately 42 per athlete, or about two per day, assuming the competitors remain in Olympic Village for the entire duration of the summer games.

But the reality of the athletes’ extracurricular activities has perhaps been blown out of proportion, an Olympic source tells Us.

“It’s pretty tough to hook up on twin beds with roommates,” the source says. “Don’t forget, even [Michael] Phelps has a roommate. It doesn’t matter how big you are. Of course people hook up, but the number of condoms they pass out is in no way a necessary amount.”

According to USA Today, the rubbers aren’t exactly freely handed out, either. “Everyone talks about how there are so many condoms for each athlete, but they don’t just give them to you,” Alexandre Haldemann, a swimmer from Switzerland, said. “You have to go and get them yourself, and you can take as many as you want.”

The Olympic Rings are displayed at the Copacabana beach ahead of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games on August 2, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
The Olympic Rings are displayed at the Copacabana beach ahead of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games on August 2, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images

The condoms are available in giant green vending machines located in public spaces, such as food halls or various lounges, and require a loud crank that ensures that everyone within hearing distance knows what athletes are up to.

“You have to turn the thing and it is really loud,” New Zealand equestrian athlete Clarke Johnstone told USA Today. “I just sort of went in and got a couple and then left, to be honest.”

The condom packets do not have the Olympic logo stamped on them, but the Olympic source tells Us that many athletes like to keep a few as mementos. “The condom story that gets so big every year is really a glorified PR stunt and every athlete takes a bunch of condoms as souvenirs,” the source said.

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