New allegations from former Playmate Victoria Valentino came out accusing Bill Cosby of raping her in 1969. Credit: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

A former Playmate has become the latest woman to speak out in light of the recent allegations of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual misconduct over his six decades in show business. Victoria Valentino was one of five women interviewed in a new Washington Post piece published on Nov. 22 making her the 16th woman to come forward in recent weeks. 

Valentino, now 71, was just 19 when she became Playmate of the Month in September 1963. Things were going well for her until 1969 when her 6-year-old son tragically died by drowning in a pool. The loss understandably caused her immense grief, and around that same time she met Cosby, now 77, in Hollywood. 

"He was trying to cheer me up, and he stuck a pill in my mouth," she said. "He said, 'This will make us all feel better.'"

She was with her friend and roommate Meg Foster at the time, and the I Spy star took the ladies back to an apartment after dinner. Valentino noticed her friend had passed out from the pills, and Cosby was standing over her with an erection and a "predatory" look, she claimed. 

"It was very clear to me that he was going to assault her while she was asleep or unconscious," Valentino alleged. "I reached out, grabbing him, trying to get his attention, trying to distract him. He came over to me and sat down on the love seat and opened his fly and grabbed my head and pushed my head down. And then he turned me over. It was like a waking nightmare."

Even now, the former model claims it's hard to talk about the experience. She decided not to come forward at the time because she felt she had little credibility.

"In those days, it was always the rape victim who wound up being victimized. You didn’t want to go to the police. That’s the last thing you wanted to do back then," she said. "You just feel ashamed and dirty even though it wasn't your fault." 

Cosby himself spoke out about the recent influx of allegations to Florida Today, saying, "I know people are tired of me not saying anything, but a guy doesn't have to answer to innuendos. People should fact-check. People shouldn't have to go through that and they shouldn't answer to innuendos."

The beloved actor's lawyer Marty Singer also released a statement, telling the Washington Post, "The new, never-before-heard claims from women who have come forward in the past two weeks with unsubstantiated, fantastical stories about things they say occurred 30, 40, or even 50 years ago have escalated far past the point of absurdity. These brand new claims about alleged decades-old events are becoming increasingly ridiculous, and it is completely illogical that so many people would have said nothing, done nothing, and made no reports to law enforcement or asserted civil claims if they thought they had been assaulted over a span of so many years."