Ashton Kutcher: My Wife, Mila Kunis, Came Here on a Refugee Visa and ‘My Blood Is Boiling’ Over Trump’s Ban

Ashton Kutcher slammed Donald Trump's refugee ban on Twitter on Sunday, January 29, pointing out that his wife, Mila Kunis, emigrated from her native Ukraine to the United States in the early ’90s.

"My wife came to this country on a refugee visa in the middle of the Cold War! My blood is boiling right now!" the Ranch actor, 38, tweeted. "We have never been a nation built on fear. Compassion that is the root ethic of America. Our differences are fundamental 2R sustainability." (Kutcher also gave an impassioned speech at the Screen Actors Guild Awards later that night – watch what he had to say in the video above!)

Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis
Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis attend the 2016 'Billboard' Music Awards in Las Vegas on May 22, 2016. Todd Williamson/BBMA2016/Getty Images for dcp

Kunis, 33, was born in the Ukrainian city of Chernivtsi and grew up in communist Russia. In 1991, when she was 7 years old, Kunis immigrated to Los Angeles with her parents, Mark and Elvira, and her older brother, Michael.

"My parents both had amazing jobs, and I was very lucky," she told The Telegraph in September 2011. "We were not poor when we lived in Russia, whereas most people were very unfortunate. My parents thought that my brother and I would have no future there, though, so we moved to the United States."

The Golden Globe–nominated Black Swan actress' family arrived in L.A. with just $250. "That was all we were allowed to take with us," she told the newspaper. "My parents had given up good jobs and degrees, which were not transferable."

Seven years later, Kunis and Kutcher both landed starring roles in That ’70s Show. The costars and onscreen couple started dating in real life in 2012 and married in July 2015. They are the parents of daughter Wyatt, 2, and son Dimitri, 1 month.

Kutcher's passionate anti-Trump remarks came on the heels of the businessman's executive order, which indefinitely banned admissions for Syrian refugees, barred citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. for at least the next 90 days, and suspended the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program for 120 days. The controversial order resulted in back-to-back days of protests across major cities, including New York, Boston and Washington, D.C.

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