Hillary Clinton Lost the Election But Might Still Win the Popular Vote

UPDATE 11/9 1:35 p.m. ET: Hillary Clinton is still leading the popular vote with 59,602,283 to Donald Trump’s 59,396,462, CNN reported at 1:27 p.m. ET.

Prior to the Democratic candidate's concession speech on Wednesday morning at NYC’s New Yorker Hotel, Clinton's vice presidential running mate, Tim Kaine, congratulated the former secretary of state on her showing in the popular vote. “She has made history in a nation that is so good in so many things but has made it so uniquely difficult for a women to make it into a federal office,” he said. "Last night she won the popular vote from Americans. That is an amazing accomplishment."

When Clinton took the stage, she said she hopes she can work together with Trump and that it’s always worth it to fight for what is right. She also told women to keep fighting and that one day, someone will break the glass ceiling. 

Original story below

Although Donald Trump won the presidential election with the necessary 270 (and counting) electoral votes, Hillary Clinton may still win the popular vote.

Clinton had a slight edge with 59,293,087 total votes to Trump’s 59,131,346, as of 9:51 a.m. ET on Wednesday, November 9, with an estimated 92 percent of votes counted, CNN reports.

Minnesota, Michigan, New Hampshire and others are still tallying up their final numbers, and some states will be receiving absentee ballots for weeks that could change the final count for the popular vote. 

Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton during the final presidential debate in Las Vegas in 2016. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Still, as of Wednesday morning, The New York Times projects that Clinton will win the popular vote by 0.6 percentage points. The explanation: California and New York are two of the most populous states in the country. Clinton won both of these states by large margins, racking up tons of votes that have no effect on the number of electoral votes she received from them. (She won New York’s 29 votes and California’s 55.) In the largest red state, Texas, Trump won the 38 electoral votes but by a significantly smaller margin.

Only a few candidates in the past have won the popular vote but lost the election, including Al Gore in 2000. Prior to that, it happened just three other times, in the 1800s with Benjamin Harrison, Rutherford B. Hayes and John Quincy Adams.

As previously reported, it became apparent early Wednesday morning that Trump had enough electoral votes to take the White House, and the former secretary of state called the business mogul to concede. The former Apprentice host took the stage shortly before 3 a.m. ET in NYC to deliver his victory speech, saying that he “congratulated [Clinton] and her family on a very, very hard-fought campaign. She fought very hard.”

 

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