Jessica Simpson spoke with the Today show's Matt Lauer about being "more addicted" to husband Eric Johnson since their wedding, and becoming a "champion" for women struggling to feel comfortable in their bodies Credit: Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Eric Johnson's love is Jessica Simpson's drug. The fashion mogul, 34, told the Today show's Matt Lauer on Wednesday, Sept. 24, that she just can't get enough of her husband since they tied the knot back in July. 

"I just think we're a little bit more addicted to each other," Simpson said of her love of four years, with whom she has two kids, daughter Maxwell, 2, and son Ace, 14 months. "I just think there is a level of love that has reached the highest of high."

Asked how she knew he was The One, she said, "Well, Eric and I have both been married before, so we took our time finding the right person. When we found each other, we knew it had to be forever." (Simpson was famously wed to Nick Lachey from 2002 to 2006, while Johnson was married to Keri D'Angelo from 2005 to 2010.)

Indeed, the singer and her former NFL player beau got engaged just a few months after they started dating in 2010 — but they didn't walk down the aisle until this summer. "We were engaged and then I got pregnant," she told Lauer of why they waited so long. "Oops." 

The Weight Watchers spokeswoman also spoke on the Today show about getting back into shape after baby, and dealing with people who body-shamed her between pregnancies. At one point, Lauer asked if she felt she had been held to an unfair standard because she'd "been known as a sex symbol for so long." 

"I don't think that I wasn't still a sex symbol," she replied. "To my husband I was extremely sexy." Other people's opinions didn't really matter, she added. "It wasn't my priority to please the public and make them feel like I'm supposed to be looking like I did when I was 24," she told Lauer.

Which is not to say it was easy to read negative comments about her weight. "I'm not saying they didn't hurt. I'm a woman. I have feelings, hormones," she said. "I got emotional about it at times. But if anything, I just wanted to be a champion for other women and say, 'We can do this.'"