Chelsea Clinton: 3 Reasons to Vote for My Mom

For 36 years, Chelsea Clinton has watched her mom, Hillary, shatter glass ceilings. Now the NYC-based mother of Charlotte, 2, and Aidan, 4 months (with husband Marc Mezvinsky, 38), intends to see the Democratic nominee, 69, become the first female leader of the free world. Ahead of the November 8 election, the Clinton Foundation vice chair pens a personal appeal for Us, explaining why she stands with her.*

Young Chelsea with her parents, Bill and Hillary Clinton Seth Poppel/Yearbook Library

1. She cares about children — not just her own (me!).

Growing up, I never doubted I was my mom’s first priority. My mom’s first questions over dinner always focused on what I’d learned that day and what I hoped to learn and do tomorrow. She would then share what she’d worked on as a lawyer and an advocate. I loved knowing what legal aid was in first grade and about health-care reform in eighth grade. I remember being so proud of what my mom was doing to achieve more and better opportunities for all kids, including her efforts to improve public schools in Arkansas.

I have so many memories as a kid of tagging along with my mom to work some Saturdays after my Brownie troop meeting or soccer game — a trade-off she made so she could be at those family dinners, those meetings and those games — and looking up to her (figuratively and literally!) as she worked so hard as a lawyer and champion for kids. My mom ensured I knew how lucky I was. Ensuring that every child has the chance to live up to their God-given potential is the driving motivation of my mom’s life. It’s why she’s still working on paid family and medical leave, early childhood education and health-care reform — and why she’ll combat climate change, make college actually affordable and so much more. She knows the future is at stake for all our kids.

Hillary Clinton and daughter Chelsea at the White House in 1994. Nancy Ellison/Polaris

2. She keeps fighting — and never forgets who she is fighting for.

I have seen my mom do some pretty remarkable things — and, yes, I am biased — including helping to create the Children’s Health Insurance Program [or CHIP, which offers low-cost health coverage to children]. In 1994, when I was 14, my mom’s efforts on universal health care were unsuccessful. It was hard to watch, but I wasn’t surprised when my mom didn’t give up. She dusted herself off and got right back out on the front lines to advocate for kids. A few years later [in 1997], CHIP was created. I don’t think it ever occurred to her to stop fighting, because she never forgot what’s at stake. Today, CHIP provides more than 8 million children with the health care they need.

Bill Clinton, Marc Mezvinsky, Chelsea Clinton (holding her newborn son Aidan) and Hillary Clinton exit Lenox Hill Hospital, June 20, 2016 in New York City. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

3. She’s an example to girls.

Politics has taken on a new urgency for me since becoming a parent. Politics now feels more personal than ever before because I know who we elect both shapes the legislation that gets passed and sets an example for our children.

So, while I am unabashedly and unapologetically biased toward my mom, I couldn’t imagine a better president for our children and grandchildren. I am going to vote for the candidate whose actions and words tell my daughter, Charlotte, and my son, Aidan — and all children — that a girl can grow up to be president. And that would be true whether or not Hillary was my mom. I can’t wait to cast my vote for her on November 8 and hope you will too.

*Us invited Ivanka Trump to write about her father, Republican presidential nominee Donald, but she failed to respond.

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