Election Results 2016: Full Recap of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton’s Presidential Battle in Our Live Blog

It all comes down to this! After a U.S. presidential race that has become one of the wildest and least predictable in recent memory, Americans take to the ballot boxes on Tuesday, November 8, to decide whether Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton will be sworn in as the next commander in chief.

Us Weekly will be following all the Election Day action, from the midnight voters to the final results later tonight. Check back for frequent updates, and scroll down to see what's happened so far. (Be sure to start reading at the bottom if you want to get it in chronological order.)

11/9 1:33 a.m. ET: CNN reports that Trump has prepared two speeches; a victory speech and a concession speech. If he is declared the winner, he will be "gracious" in his speech and inclusive towards those who didn't vote for him.

11/9 1:30 a.m. ET: Life imitating art?

11/9 1:27 a.m. ET: Sarah Palin weighs in on the election.

11/9 1:18 a.m. ET: Life can have its peaks and valleys, even when you're a rock star.

11/9 1:11 a.m. ET: At this point, there's only one thing that can be said for sure about the outcome of the 2016 presidential election: No matter who wins, it's going to be a squeaker. And if there's anyone whose words can sustain us while we watch and wait to see the final results — which, let's be honest, may not be official until Wednesday morning or even later in the week — it's world-class historian (and American Horror Story cameo-maker) Doris Kearns Goodwin.

"We underestimated the feelings of people who felt the political system had left them down at this point in time," Goodwin said, speaking with MSNBC. And the worst part, she explained, is that no matter who is elected, half the country will feel not just disappointed, but like the system failed them. Comparing our current political climate to the industrial revolution at the turn of 20th century — when rapid change created what the historian describes as "a cultural divide" — she noted that what America needs now is someone who unifies us and makes us feel like we're all in it together:

"We need somebody to just make us believe in the public system again."

In other words, our best hope for a less dysfunctional nation might just be election 2020. You know, just to give you something to look forward to.

11/9 1:04 p.m. ET: The New York Times says Trump has a 95 percent chance of victory.

11/9 1:03 p.m. ET: Some maps are a little more opinionated than others. 

11/9 12:57 a.m. ET: At the Javits Center, the crowd has gone from excited to anxious to subdued to despairing, although — as the talking heads on TV keep reminding us — it's still not over. Nevertheless, those hoping for a landslide in favor of our first female president are super bummed, understandably. Emoji artists, on the other hand, are using this historic moment to full advantage.

11/9 12:54 a.m. ET: Instagram users are appreciating this hopeful message from Lance Bass:

I totally understand why this country has voted the way it has. The people are not happy. I respect that. Let's all please come together and influence this new President in a positive way. The country is speaking. Let's respect that and try to work together. I will try to influence this new President as much as I can and support them as much as I can. I pray that they believe in equality. I pray that they make this country a place my future children with gay parents can feel safe and thrive. Let us all try to understand why this country is upset. Let's please come together and love one another. We might not agree with everything a candidate supports, but We The People can still make our voices heard and guide this new President in the right direction. We still live in the greatest country in the world. Don't forget that! We are great and we will continue to get better!! #StrongerTogether

A post shared by Lance Bass (@lancebass) on

11/9 12:50 a.m. ET: Nevada, with its six electoral votes, has been called for Clinton — a victory that leaves all eyes on the terribly tight races in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, New Hampshire and Maine. There's still a path open to the presidency for either candidate, but for Clinton, it's quite narrow.

Also, with all eyes on the various elections, it's easy to forget that we weren't only voting for people today. The death penalty was on ballots in three states today, with Nebraskans voting to restore the punishment and Oklahomans voting to keep it and give it constitutional protections. California, where voters had the choice to decide whether to reform their death penalty or repeal it entirely, is still counting votes, but seems to be leaning toward the former.

11/9 12:44 a.m. ET: Hillary Clinton's party isn't quite as raucous as it once was.

11/9 12:38 a.m. ET: Seven states still have yet to be called: Pennsylvania, Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, New Hampshire, Maine and Arizona.

11/9 12:33 a.m. ET: On MSNBC, presidential historian Michael Beschloss has weighed in on just how unprecedented a Trump presidency will be: "This will be the first president we've ever had with zero military experience, zero public service experience."

Meanwhile, global financial markets have tanked so badly that it triggered a crash warning, halting all futures until Wednesday morning. And all over the internet, previously giddy election watchers are finding more productive, less anxiety-inducing ways to spend their time. This journalist is relaxing with a nice, soothing podcast about murder:

11/9 12:30 a.m. ET: Maybe Ben Schwartz's Jean-Ralphio character from Parks & Rec really is related to Stranger Things' Steve. 

11/9 12:20 a.m. ET: The swing states continue to swing; in the meantime, continued counting of votes from recently closed polls in California, Washington and Oregon shows Clinton closing on Trump in the popular vote. That doesn't do anything to reassure those who hoped to see her become president, but a source of much interest for political wonks. Thanks to our electoral college system, it's rare but possible for a candidate to win the majority of votes overall nationwide, but still lose the election.

As the wait for official calls in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin drags out, the talking heads on cable TV have turned to debating whether a President Trump could deliver on his various campaign promises — which included building a wall to keep out illegal immigrants at Mexico's expense, and banning Muslims from entering the U.S. on a whole.

Finally, a tiny dribble of good news for Dems: Catherine Cortez Masto has won her race in the state of Nevada, becoming the first Latina ever elected to the U.S. Senate.

11/9 12:17 a.m. ET: Leave it to Azealia Banks to speak her mind. 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BMk8ZFOBbzt/

11/9 12:11 a.m. ET: In case anyone had any question about the mood at the Javits Center among Clinton loyals.

The mood is stoic here at the Javitz Center. #electionnight

A post shared by Jeff Ross (@therealjeffreyross) on

11/9 12:07 a.m. ET: With the outcome of the 2016 presidential election utterly unpredictable, MSNBC checked in with Rudy Guilani at Trump HQ in New York. The former New York mayor, who was a prominent campaigner for the GOP nominee, got slightly ahead of himself as he declared that these results will be "a good thing for the country."

Across town, at a very quiet Javitz Center, the crowd had gone from being anxious to subdued. Clinton's team, meanwhile, has stopped updating social media.

11/8 11:50 p.m. ET: Some Clinton supporters can't figure out what's real.

11/8 11:42 p.m. ET: Us' reporters spotted Melanie Griffith, dressed in black, at the Javits Center for Clinton's election shindig. 

11/8 11:41 p.m. ET: Fox now gives Georgia to Trump. Earlier tonight, CBS had seen the state as likely to go to Clinton. 

11/8 11:36 p.m. ET: House Speaker Paul Ryan has won reelection and looked remarkably at ease in his victory speech, despite a contentious campaign season in which he was often at odds with the GOP presidential nominee. Depending on the outcome of the remaining battleground states, Ryan may be making nice with Trump for the next four years of our lives. Florida, Iowa and Utah have all been called in favor of the Republican candidate.

11/8 11:33 p.m. ET: MSNBC hands Utah to Trump.

11/8 11:32 p.m. ET: Wisconsin, a state that has gone blue in every presidential election for more than 30 years, is trending heavily for Trump — and making Clinton supporters nervous. With 65 percent of the votes counted, it's still considered too early to call, but rural white working-class voters pulled through for the GOP nominee there, as they have elsewhere. Meanwhile, the votes siphoned from the main event and funneled to libertarian candidate Gary Johnson are driving many voters to the literal brink of madness.

11/8 11:29 p.m. ET: Glee alum Heather Morris is letting her clothes do the talking.

Me if Trump wins this election

A post shared by Heather Morris (@heatherrelizabethh) on

11/8 11:21 p.m. ET: Us can report that the mood is very glum among partygoers at the Clinton election event at the Javits Center in Brooklyn. Dancing With the Stars season 22 champ Nyle DiMarco is among the celebs in attendance. 

11/8 11:18 p.m. ET: CNN now projects Trump to take 4 of the 5 electoral votes in Nebraska, rather than the previously projected 3 of 5.

11/8 11:15 p.m. ET: Another wave of polls have closed on the West Coast, and as expected, Clinton is the projected winner in California, Oregon, Washington and Hawaii; Trump will take Idaho. That leaves everyone watching the still-undecided swath of battleground states, many on the East Coast, which will be responsible for deciding this election. 

Not gonna lie, the discourse surrounding this race is darker than usual; even the expected chatter about fleeing the country in the wake of an unfavorable election result has a tinge of extra realness.

11/8 11:05 p.m. ET: Clinton grabs Hawaii, while Trump snags Idaho and the very pivotal North Carolina. Trump is definitely looking likely the likely winner. 

11/8 11 p.m. ET: Clinton takes California, moving ahead of Trump in the electoral-college map count. Oregon and Washington are too close to call. 

10:57 p.m. ET: While Hillary Clinton is the projected winner in VIrginia and Colorado, all eyes are now on Michigan, and it looks like we'll be watching it well into the night. Michigan was another state where Barack Obama dominated in 2008 and 2012; if it goes for the GOP this time around, it'll give Trump a legitimate path to the presidency, while diminishing Clinton's chances in a major way. One of the biggest shocks of the night is how badly the Democratic nominee is trailing in Macomb County, which has a majority white working-class population that doesn't always vote blue. In the 1980s, they were the Reagan Democrats; in 2016, they might go for Trump.

Liberal Twitter is currently a mess of people wondering how this could happen, leading to a theory advanced by New York Times reporter Nate Cohn.

In a busy Michigan bar, one Trump voter crowed to an MSNBC reporter that "Michigan is in play, and we are taking back our country!"

11/8 10:52 p.m. ET: Trump lands a major battleground state, picking up Florida, according to the Associated Press. Other outlets have yet to call the state yet.

11/8 10:50 p.m. ET: Clinton picks up Colorado. Trump leads with 167 electoral votes, and Clinton holds 131.

11/8 10:47 p.m. ET: Follow the race to 270 electoral votes with this live-updating map:

11/8 10:43 p.m. ET: More stars pulling for Clinton are feeling the heat.

Art imitates life. I may throw up tonight. #election2016 #misssloane

A post shared by Jessica Chastain (@jessicachastain) on

11/8 10:37 p.m. ET: Katy Perry, wearing red, addressed the crowd at Clinton's election night party at the Javits Center in Brooklyn, New York. She admitted her parents voted for Trump, and reminded everyone that we all love our parents. The pop star said we need to focus on unity, and make history again, and make hate and bigotry history. 

11/8 10:28 p.m. ET: Clinton lands Virginia, and Us can report that the crowd at the Javits Center erupted in cheers upon hearing the news.

11/8 10:27 p.m. ET: Trump takes Ohio.

11/8 10:24 p.m. ET: In this long, slow limbo as we wait for the ever-growing list of tossup states to be called, here's a dutiful reminder: As alarmed as Clinton's supporters are, Trump's team isn't dancing in the streets, either. If you've ever wondered what Donald Trump looks like in a candid, anxious moment, daughter Ivanka tweeted out a shot of the whole Trump/Pence team watching the returns roll in.

And hey, you've gotta hand it to America: No matter how terrifying our elections get, it's never too tense to make a juvenile joke about that number.

11/8: 10:19 p.m. ET: Bottoms up for Team Clinton?

Holy Shit This is scary Breaking out the whiskey #electionnight

A post shared by Felicity Huffman (@felicityhuffman) on

11/8 10:16 p.m. ET: Clinton wins New Mexico, and Trump triumphs in Missouri. 

11/8 10:11 p.m. ET: Finally, some good new for shellshocked supporters of Clinton: In Virginia, where she'd been trailing since the polls closed, the Democratic candidate gained a growing edge with about 15 percent of the vote still left to be counted. She may or may not hold onto it, but it's a small sigh of relief for anyone watching the state trend red who felt like they were taking crazy pills. (With VA governor Tim Kaine on her ticket, Clinton understandably assumed it would be a sure win.) She's also projected to win in New Mexico, a key state for Dems in the southwest.

Meanwhile, early returns from Colorado show Clinton with an edge, but it's far too early to call. And in Utah, it's not just too early to call, but unprecedented: Third-party candidate Evan McMullin mounted a real challenge in the usually GOP-dominant state, thanks to devoutly religious voters, who were unsettled by Trump's less-than-pious persona.

11/8 10:03 p.m. ET: Trump takes Montana.

11/8 10:02 p.m. ET: Many famous Clinton supporters are feeling anxiety as Trump gains steam:


11/8 9:54 p.m. ET: In case you needed a reminder of how much our election matters to the wider world, global markets are going berserk right now; DOW futures have plunged 500 points in response to the uncertainty of Election 2016. (And yes, there's speculation that we might be in the midst of our very own Brexit scenario — only instead of voting ourselves out of the EU, we'd be voting a divisive reality TV star into the highest office in the land.)

The list of states still too close to call is enormous, in every sense of the word: Florida, Ohio, Virginia, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Georgia, Minnesota and — shockingly — Michigan. Not only is the state still up for grabs, but Trump had an unexpected lead there as of this writing. 

11/8 9:46 p.m. ET: Trump takes Arkansas — where Bill Clinton was once the governor — and Louisiana. Clinton lands Connecticut. 

11/8 9:43 p.m. ET: Footage from Clinton's campaign headquarters shows supporters looking anxious, thanks to a number of presumptively blue states now being toss-ups. While Clinton motivated an enormous number of voters to the polls in urban areas, Trump's continued campaigning against political correctness definitely resonated with rural voters, including those who ordinarily don't participate in elections at all. That's a lot of first-time voters on both sides, making the race that much more unpredictable.

It's also fueling some serious saltiness on the part of Nate Silver, the vaunted statistician who gave Trump a 1-in-3 shot at the presidency in his final prediction, and who has been thoroughly annoyed in recent days by suggestions that this election would be a landslide.

11/8 9:29 p.m. ET: While votes are being tallied in states where the polls have closed, other states — including battleground Arizona — have extended their voting hours for the occasion. And because your state is legally obligated to let you vote if you are queuing at the time the polls close, it's a frantic race for many to get their butts in line. Take it from Arrow actress Bex Taylor-Klaus:

In the meantime, here's a fun surprise: The award for most culturally relevant tweet of the night so far goes to Dan Rather — who might hail from the old school of TV journalism but is not throwing away his shot (heh) at digital greatness.

11/8 9:16 p.m. ET: Us is in attendance at Clinton's election party at the Javits Center, where New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio recently gave a rousing speech to the crowd. 

11/8 9:11 pm ET: Polls have officially closed in a huge swath of states in the Midwest and Rockies, bringing a few early calls — none of them surprising. Whether or not Trump ever gets to build his infamous wall between the U.S. and Mexico, he's locked up the one that divides the Eastern and Western halves of the country, from North Dakota at the top to Texas at the bottom.

Among the battleground states that remain too close to call are Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Michigan and North Carolina. Although Clinton is currently holding strong in North Carolina, which will earn her 15 electoral votes if clinched, it's the still-close race in Florida that her supporters are looking hardest at. Through their fingers. While screaming in terror.

11/8 9:03 p.m. ET: Trump is projected to grab Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming and both North Dakota and South Dakota. Meanwhile, Clinton wins in New York, where she was a Senator. 

11/8 8:51 p.m. ET: With 20 percent of the vote in (exclusively in the Eastern half of the country), Trump is currently leading the popular vote by six percentage points.

Needless to say, it's still early, and neither candidate is having a spectacular night so far. But Twitter, on the other hand, is in rare form. Whoever ends up in the White House, jokes about our collective national panic are definitely the real winner in this election. 

11/8 8:40 p.m. ET: Speaking of there still being time for an upset: As of this writing, Clinton has lost her lead in Florida, where 91 percent of the vote is now in. (Still too close to call!) And while Trump has unsurprisingly picked up a big swath of states in the GOP-dominant South and Midwest, there's one major surprise on the menu right now: Virginia, where Democratic VP nominee Tim Kaine hails from, is currently skewing red. If this keeps up, it could spell a loss for Clinton in a state that Barack Obama won handily the last time around — and a shocking disappointment for her supporters.

Meanwhile, even if Clinton does win, it won't all be sunshine and daisies when it comes to making her policies work in Washington. The Republicans are now projected to maintain control of the House.

11/8 8:33 p.m. ET: Republicans officially control the House of Representatives. 

11/8 8:31 p.m. ET: CNN projects South Carolina and Alabama for Trump. 

11/8 8:15pm ET: Although Florida is still too close to call, early voting was widespread across the state this year, and it looks like it might have given Clinton an edge. Thanks to massive turnout in Miami-Dade County, her numbers are strong right now to the tune of a couple percentage points (although there's still time for an upset).

In non-presidential news, one of the most-watched Senate races of this year has been resolved: Democrat and veteran Tammy Duckworth unseated the Republican incumbent in Illinois, moving the needle ever so slightly in the direction of Democrats winning control. And for Rubio, who lost out to Trump in the bid for the GOP presidential nomination, tonight brings a silver lining: He may not be in the running for the White House, but he'll hang onto his Senate seat.

Meanwhile, emotions are running high as Americans watch the returns rolling in. At least one Clinton supporter was punked by a Verizon coverage map that looked a little too much like a Trump landslide. 

11/8 8:13 p.m. ET: Trump picks up Mississippi, CBS reports.

11/8 8:10 p.m. ET: Rhode Island goes to Clinton, according to CBS. 

11/8 8:09 p.m. ET: Marco Rubio, who ran for the GOP presidential nomination, has been reelected to the Senate in Florida. 

11/8 8:05 p.m. ET: Us Weekly just walked into Clinton's election night party at the Javits Center in Brooklyn, New York, where the security is intense. Among the celebrities already in attendance is Glee alum Chris Colfer. 

11/8 8:02 p.m. ET: A number of states go to Clinton: Illinois, Massachusetts, Delaware, Maryland and District of Columbia.

11/8 8:00 p.m. ET: With polls now officially closed in a handful of East Coast states, results are being tallied — and MSNBC has begun tentatively projecting a couple of clear state victories. While battleground states like Ohio are still too close to call, it looks like Donald Trump can officially count on wins in Indiana, Kentucky, West Virginia and South Carolina (33 electoral votes total). Hillary Clinton has likely clinched Vermont (3 electoral votes).

Early exit polls suggested that nobody was feeling particularly confident about either candidate: In the first round of exits, 32 percent of voters said Trump was "honest and trustworthy," while 38 percent said the same about Clinton. And demographically, the early exits showed few surprises: Trump was more popular by a large margin among non-college-educated white males, while college-educated white women were going for Clinton.

As previously mentioned, if Clinton wins, she will be celebrating her historic victory in the Javits Center — which you've probably heard by now has the symbolic oomph of being a building with a literal glass ceiling. If Donald Trump wins, he will be celebrating in the tower that bears his name, eating a cake in the demented likeness of his own head. (You know, as one does.) 

11/8 7:49 p.m. ET: Trump has nabbed South Carolina, according to MSNBC.

11/8 7:30 p.m. ET: Trump has won West Virginia, according to CNN. Important swing states Ohio and North Carolina are too early to call. CBS gives a slight edge to Clinton in Georgia and North Carolina.

11/8 7:21 p.m. ET: One major swing state is just about locked up. CNN projects Trump to win Florida, with 51 percent to Clinton's 46.6.

11/8 7:04 p.m. ET: Big news: The first states are in! CNN reports that Clinton has won Vermont, while Trump has taken Kentucky and Mike Pence's home state of Indiana. Let the games begin!

11/8 6:57 p.m. ET: Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is celebrating election night with a star-studded bash at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on Tuesday, November 8, and Us Weekly has your invite. Click here to watch the livestream and to get exclusive details from inside the bash.

11/8 4:57 p.m. ET: Voters faced long lines and "sporadic equipment failures" in several key battleground states including Florida, North Carolina and Virginia, USA Today reported. The news outlet noted that the issues aren't incidents of voter fraud.

Authorities urge voters to call the Election Protection Coalition hotline at 866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683) to report any issues to trained nationwide volunteers who can assist or answer questions.

11/8 3:40 p.m. ET: Mean Girls character Regina George trended on Twitter on Tuesday afternoon after countless people tweeted: "I'm voting for Regina George because she got hit by that bus."

Meanwhile, Donald Trump's campaign filed a lawsuit against the Clark County, Nevada, registrar, alleging that he instructed the head of the polling station to keep the location open two hours after its 8 p.m. closing time during the early voting period ahead of Election Day. Trump accused the registrar of keeping the polling place open to "help Hillary Clinton." A Nevada judge later denied the campaign's request for an order to isolate the ballots that were reportedly cast after the polls closed, CBS News reported.

As the polls close and states start to call the results of the election, click here to see when and where to watch the returns.

11/8 1:00 p.m. ET: The site CivicScience released a new survey that speculated which houses from the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry would vote for Clinton and Trump. Based on the people selected, Gryffindors would vote for the mogul while Slytherin students would side with Clinton. Find out how Hufflepuff and Ravenclaw would cast their ballots here.

11/8 12:50 p.m. ET: Voters can snag tons of freebies on Election Day by flashing their “I voted” stickers. Krispy Kreme, 7-Eleven, World of Beer and many more businesses are offering up food and drinks gratis. See the entire list of free stuff here. 

11/8 12:18 p.m. ET: During an Election Day interview on Fox & Friends, Donald Trump said he'd consider the race to the White House "a tremendous waste of time, energy and money" if he were to lose to Hillary Clinton. "I will have spent over $100 million on my own campaign," he said.

Meanwhile, several Twitter users shared photos of the impressive voter turnouts at their local polling places. "Never seen a line this long in 20 years. Longer than '08 and '12," one California voter wrote. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren also tweeted a picture of herself voting, writing, "This morning I proudly cast my vote for @HillaryClinton to be the next President of the United States. #ImWithHer."

People also flocked to Susan B. Anthony's gravesite at Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, New York, to place their "I Voted" stickers on the late women's rights suffragist's tombstone.

And thousands of miles away in Los Angeles, Kourtney Kardashian tweeted her support for Hillary Clinton, sharing an adorable photo of her daughter, Penelope, and sister Kim Kardashian's daughter, North West, holding hands. "For our future, I'm with her," the reality star wrote.

Can't get enough of the Election Day tweets? Us Weekly rounded up the 25 funniest posts — click here to see the list!

11/8 11:33 a.m. ET: Hillary Clinton voted this morning in Chappaqua, New York, the NY Times reports. "It's a humbling feeling," she told reporters outside the polling location.

A mob of people surround Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as she votes at Douglas Grafflin Elementary School on November 8, 2016 in Chappaqua, New York. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Meanwhile, Trump and his wife, Melania Trump, cast their votes at a polling place in Manhattan's Upper East Side neighborhood around 11 a.m. local time.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump cast their votes on Election Day at PS 59 November 8, 2016 in New York City. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

11/8 10:44 a.m. ET: Celebs headed to the polls early this Election Day! Stars including Neil Patrick Harris, Mariska Hargitay, America Ferrera, Uzo Aduba and Karlie Kloss are posting their "I Voted" pics on Instagram. 

"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. – Martin Luther King Jr." #VOTE

A post shared by Neil Patrick Harris (@nph) on

#VOTE

A post shared by Mariska Hargitay (@therealmariskahargitay) on

Democracy rules! One voice, one vote! Go get your vote on! #ivoted ???

A post shared by America Ferrera (@americaferrera) on

Starting the morning right. #Vote #election2016 #workday

A post shared by Uzo Aduba (@uzoaduba) on

11/8 9:25 a.m. ET: Chance The Rapper led a parade of thousands of fans to early voting sites after performing a free outdoor concert in his hometown of Chicago on Monday, November 7. The "No Problem" rapper is no stranger to politics; his father, Ken Bennett, once worked for then-Senator Barack Obama and is now a deputy chief of staff to Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Earlier this year, Chance met with President Obama at the White House to address the My Brother's Keeper Community Challenge initiative, in addition to teaming up with the NAACP to allow fans to register to vote while attending his Magnificent Coloring World Tour concerts.

11/8 9:00 a.m. ET: Katy Perry is at it again, encouraging voters to head to the polls and cast their ballots for Hillary Clinton. The pop superstar appeared in an ad for the Democratic candidate holding an adorable brown puppy named Nugget.

Perry wasn’t the only celeb doing some last-minute campaigning for Clinton. Madonna performed at a surprise rally at New York’s Washington Square Park on Monday, November 7. Meanwhile, Lady Gaga and Jon Bon Jovi joined the Oval Office hopeful for her final rally at North Carolina State University in Raleigh on Monday evening. 

11/8 8:52 a.m. ET: Donald Trump took an early lead in the 2016 presidential election after midnight voting in three super tiny towns in the swing state of New Hampshire. Communities in New Hampshire with fewer than 100 voters can open the polls at 12 a.m. and close them as soon as all registered voters have cast their ballots.

The polls in Dixville Notch, Hart’s Location and Millsfield showed the Republican presidential nominee was winning 32-25 overall. Clinton was victorious in Dixville Notch and Hart’s Location, but Trump pushed ahead with 16 votes in Millsfield and just 4 going to Clinton.

11/7: Stephen Colbert and James Corden got their final jabs in on the eve of the election during their late-night shows. Colbert reunited with Daily Show colleague Jon Stewart to poke fun at Trump. They put on a hilarious musical and encouraged a "little street urchin" to vote.

Corden, meanwhile, had Benedict Cumberbatch read him a bedtime story titled The Story of the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. In the book, Clinton goes through a dangerous forest and bumps into Trump, an "orange monster," along the way.

Original story continues below:

Polls show the candidates neck-and-neck heading into the November 8 showdown, as the race is likely to come down to key battleground states, including Florida, Colorado, Ohio, North Carolina, Maine, Arizona, Virginia, Nevada and Iowa.

Numerous celebs have shared selfies of themselves casting early ballots, with Drew Barrymore, Eva Longoria, Lauren Conrad, Ian Somerhalder and NeNe Leakes all taking part. Jessica Biel's humorous post poked fun at the controversy surrounding husband Justin Timberlake, who could have been in hot water for snapping a pic on October 24 of himself casting a ballot in his home state of Tennessee, where photos are not allowed to be taken at polling stations.

Both candidates have been endorsed by an array of popular entertainers. Trump's fan base counts such celebs as Jon Voight, Teresa Giudice, Stephen Baldwin, Scott Baio, Stacey Dash and Mike Tyson. Among the more vocal supporters of Clinton include Jay Z and Beyonce, Madonna, Miley Cyrus, Leonardo DiCaprio, Shonda Rhimes and Natalie Portman.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton
Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University in 2016. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Election Day 2016 puts an end to a campaign season that has been highlighted by several headline-grabbing scandals. This includes Trump enduring controversy surrounding a video published by the Washington Post on October 7 that features the GOP presidential nominee's boasts about groping women. The real estate mogul has defended the remarks as "locker-room talk."

Meanwhile, Clinton has dealt with continued questions centered on her emails sent from a private server while she was Secretary of State. (After FBI director James B. Comey announced on October 28 that his agency was taking "investigative steps" to reexamine the Democratic candidate's server, he told Congress on Sunday, November 6, that Clinton still will not face criminal charges.)

It's anyone's guess as to what time a winner might be declared. During 2012's battle between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, media outlets began calling the election for Obama shortly after he won Ohio at around 11:15 p.m. ET. However, Romney didn't concede defeat until 1 a.m. ET the next morning.

Continue to refresh this post throughout the day for by-the-minute updates on election results as they come in, along with social media posts and videos from the last day on the campaign trail. And don't forget to vote!

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